CBS Still Selling Books for Race-Baiter Kendi After His VILE Attack on Justice Barrett

On Monday, CBS This Morning happily brought on race-baiting radical Professor Ibram X. Kendi to sell his latest book and mark the beginning of Black History Month. Amazingly, despite having him on for the first time in months since he hurled vile attacks at then-Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett and her black adopted children, the hosts never bothered to ask him about his despicable remarks.

At the top of the friendly chat, co-host Anthony Mason made it clear that the only item on the agenda was hawking Kendi’s new book:

Today marks the first day of Black History Month, a time for celebration and education of African-American culture. Authors Ibram X. Kendi and Keisha Blain are releasing a new book called Four Hundred Souls: A Community History of African America, 1619 to 2019. The anthology features essays from 90 writers and poets who each focus on a specific period of time.

 

 

Introducing the authors, he reminded viewers of Kendi’s direct connection to CBS: “Keisha Blain is an historian and professor at the University of Pittsburgh and CBS News contributor Ibram X. Kendi is the founding director of the Boston University Center for Anti-Racist Research.”

Of course that raises the question of why the network would want to continue to associate itself with someone who tarred a Supreme Court justice as a “white colonizer” because she and her husband adopted two black children from Haiti.

“I want to thank you both for having short chapters. Makes it – it was such a great read because you could zip through it very quickly,” co-host and Democratic Party donor Gayle King raved to Blain and Kendi, prompting a round of laughter.

Wrapping up the softball interview minutes later, King made her best sales pitch for the book:

Thank you both. You said, “The book shows that black people never stop dreaming or fighting for their dreams to become a reality.” And certainly some of that continues today. I’m going to hold up the book, if you don’t mind. Ibram X. Kendi and Keisha Blain, we thank you both. Four Hundred Souls goes on sale tomorrow wherever you like to buy your books.

It’s sadly predictable that leftists like Kendi are never held accountable for their disgusting rhetoric by the same hypocritical media that routinely deliver lectures on civility.
    
Kendi being welcomed back on the morning show was brought to viewers by GEICO and Planet Fitness. You can fight back by letting these advertisers know what you think of them sponsoring such content.

Here is a transcript of the February 1 questions to Kendi:

8:35 AM ET

ANTHONY MASON: Today marks the first day of Black History Month, a time for celebration and education of African-American culture. Authors Ibram X. Kendi and Keisha Blain are releasing a new book called Four Hundred Souls: A Community History of African America, 1619 to 2019. The anthology features essays from 90 writers and poets who each focus on a specific period of time. Keisha Blain is an historian and professor at the University of Pittsburgh and CBS News contributor Ibram X. Kendi is the founding director of the Boston University Center for Anti-Racist Research. They join us first on CBS This Morning. Welcome to you both, congratulations, thank you so much for being here.

Ibram, let me start with you. Because this is a book that has, as I pointed out, 90 different authors, a variety of voices, why was it important that you use so many authors?

(…)

GAYLE KING: You know what I thought was interesting – number one, I want to thank you both for having short chapters. Makes it – [Laughter] it was such a great read because you could zip through it very quickly. So I thank you for that. Number two, there were so many stories I didn’t know. Hugh Davis was one that stuck out to me, was a white man who was beaten because he had slept with a black woman. And that was an interesting twist in what the stories that we’ve been told in the past. Why you include that, professor?

(…)

KING: And as we mark black history month, it always sticks in my craw that it’s the shortest month of the year, but that’s another story. What do you want people to know? What should we remember and take from this month as we begin to honor and observe and celebrate? Professor Kendi?

(…)

KING: Thank you both. You said, “The book shows that black people never stop dreaming or fighting for their dreams to become a reality.” And certainly some of that continues today. I’m going to hold up the book, if you don’t mind. Ibram X. Kendi and Keisha Blain, we thank you both. Four Hundred Souls goes on sale tomorrow wherever you like to buy your books.

(…)

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