MSNBC’s Ruhle Wrongly Charges Tom Cotton with Baseball Hypocrisy

After weeks of saying that cancel culture is just a made-up and irrelevant culture war grievance, MSNBC’s Stephanie Ruhle accused conservatives on Monday of hypocritically cancelling Major League Baseball after the league announced it would be removing the 2021 All-Star Game from Atlanta.

Towards the end of a segment with CNBC’s Squawk Box co-host Andrew Ross Sorkin, referenced an interview Squawk Box did with Sen. Tom Cotton, “A double-edged sword with a side of hypocrisy. I know this morning you actually spoke to Republican Tom Cotton. It’s Republicans for weeks, months, years, have been railing against this idea of cancel culture. Yet, aren’t we hearing from Republican after Republican who are now saying we are going to boycott Major League Baseball? How does that add up?”

During that nearly 15 minute interview, Cotton called MLB and other corporations hypocrites, and said they had no idea what they were talking about when it comes to the Georgia election law, and encouraged rank-and-file employees to urge their CEOs to stay in their lanes. But he never called for a conservative boycott of professional baseball. Did Ruhle even watch the Cotton interview?

Sorkin didn’t correct her, but agreed with her. “Look the truth is that there is — I hate to say there’s canceling going on, on both sides but there is canceling going on, on both sides. You do have lots of folks who are being quite hypocritical.” 

Cotton also said that “Sometimes businesses are right, sometimes they’re wrong,” but Sorkin still accused Cotton and presumably other Republicans as well, of being hypocrites on the voting laws. “We did have the senator on the program this morning. He, by the way, has donors, taken corporate money from the likes of Walmart and Bank of America and Paul Weiss, all of which, by the way, are on the other side of this issue.”

Sorkin concluded  by predicting this is just the beginning of this fight, “So I think we’re going to see lots of folks on different sides of this issue and it’s a fight I think we’re going to be dealing with and contending with for a long time. But I’m not sure it’s ultimately about canceling so much as if these are real moral issues and the question is what is the role of business supposed to be in them?”

After several days of conservatives being called Jim Crow acolytes and MLB making their decision based on those lies, Ruhle concluded the segment by wondering why we can’t debate our differences in a reasonable manner, “Maybe that’s exactly it. It’s not about cancel culture. It’s just not about blind faith behind one party or one organization forevermore. You can disagree on issues and hopefully get better and smarter together in the long run.”

The liberal media could start by dumping the Jim Crow nonsense. 

This segment was sponsored by Ancestry. Cotton’s interview is below:

Here is a transcript for the April 5 show:

MSNBC
MSNBC Live with Stephanie Ruhle

9:24 AM ET

STEPHANIE RUHLE: A double-edged sword with a side of hypocrisy. I know this morning you actually spoke to Republican Tom Cotton. 

ANDREW ROSS SORKIN: Yep. 

RUHLE: It’s Republicans for weeks, months, years, have been railing against this idea of “cancel culture.” Yet, aren’t we hearing from Republican after Republican who are now saying we are going to boycott Major League Baseball? How does that add up? 

SORKIN: Look the truth is that there is — I hate to say there’s canceling going on, on both sides but there is canceling going on, on both sides. You do have lots of folks who are being quite hypocritical. We did have the senator on the program this morning. He, by the way, has donors, taken corporate money from the likes of Walmart and Bank of America and Paul Weiss, all of which, by the way, are on the other side of this issue. So I think we’re going to see lots of folks on different sides of this issue and it’s a fight I think we’re going to be dealing with and contending with for a long time. But I’m not sure it’s ultimately about canceling so much as if these are real moral issues and the question is what is the role of business supposed to be in them? 

RUHLE: Maybe that’s exactly it. It’s not about cancel culture. It’s just not about blind faith behind one party or one organization forevermore. You can disagree on issues and hopefully get better and smarter together in the long run. Andrew, always good to see you. 

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